St Nicks

Centre for nature and green living

Sustainable water

Tang Hall Beck (photo by Lewis Outing) - In July 2015, St Nicks received its fifth consecutive Green Flag Community Award thanks in no small part to the tireless work of volunteers in maintaining Osbaldwick Beck and Tang Hall Beck as natural, litter-free waterways. Such efforts help reduce water pollution not only in the areas covered by the nature reserve but also much further downstream contributing to a positive impact on local water resources. Natural waterways have also been helped by improvements to the habitat of native species such as water voles and through invasive species clearing.
Tang Hall Beck (photo by Lewis Outing) - In July 2015, St Nicks received its fifth consecutive Green Flag Community Award thanks in no small part to the tireless work of volunteers in maintaining Osbaldwick Beck and Tang Hall Beck as natural, litter-free waterways. Such efforts help reduce water pollution not only in the areas covered by the nature reserve but also much further downstream contributing to a positive impact on local water resources. Natural waterways have also been helped by improvements to the habitat of native species such as water voles and through invasive species clearing.

Water is a precious resource without which life would not exist. Our use of it is not always visible – we see the water in our showers, drinks and washing but even more water is used to grow our food and make our clothes or other products. The Sustainable Water principle is described by Bioregional as ‘using water efficiently in buildings, farming and manufacturing [and] designing to avoid local issues such as flooding, drought and water course pollution.’

There are many ways in which dedication to this principle is in evidence at St Nicks, most notably by utilising compost toilets and a straw bale urinal rather than standard toilets. We save thousands of litres of water every year by not having to flush our toilets, and we produce great compost which we use to help young trees when planting them out in the clay on the nature reserve. We appreciate that this approach to water saving may not appeal to everyone but there are many other ways in which one can save water.

 

How can you save water and help keep it clean?

 

Below are just some of the many reasons why it’s good to save water, not least because it saves energy and money:
(Most of the following statistics came from At Home With Water report produced by the Energy Saving Trust in 2013)

This page was last updated 1 Feb 2017